What storytellers can do – Erin Morgenstern QUOTES FOR WRITERS (and people who like quotes)

It reminds me of the saying, “The pen is mightier than the sword.” With such power comes great responsibility, per Spiderman’s wise uncle.
With Love,
Russ

BRIDGET WHELAN writer

alice-in-wonderland-30130_640You may tell a tale that takes up residence in someone’s soul, becomes their blood and self and purpose. That tale will move them and drive them and who knows what they might do because of it, because of your words. That is your role, your gift.
Erin Morgenstern

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Quotes for Writers (and people who like quotes) STEPHEN KING

It is the Goldilocks question I often ask myself. “Is it too little, too much, or just right?”
Russ

BRIDGET WHELAN writer

Description is what makes the reader a sensory participant in the story. Good description is a learned skill, one of the prime reasons why you cannot succeed unless you read a lot and write a lot. It’s not just a question of how-to, you see; it’s also a question of how much to. Reading will help you answer how much, and only reams of writing will help you with the how. You can learn only by doing.
Stephen King

893 Seiten Stephen King Seiten Stephen King (Photo credit: Last Hero)

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Do writers really put you in their books? #amwriting #writing

I too collect names, and do some o the other things mentioned in this post.
With Love,
Russ

G.L. Cromarty

Some writers (A) are very open about putting people they know in their book, whether it is revenge (never be mean to a writer), or for less nefarious reasons (I admire you, I love you, I like you, you are fun, you are interesting).

Some writers (B) deny all, even vague, linkage between real people and the fictional characters in their book.

I’m going to let you into a secret. If you know a writer . . . you are almost certainly, okay definitely, in their book!

So, are these writers (B) lying? Are they seeking to mislead you?

No, not really, it’s more of a—subconscious inclusion—that a writer cannot possibly help.

The thing is, that a writer crafts their story out of their imagination, which is made up of everything they have ever seen, everything they have ever heard, and everything they have ever read. And while much of this input is from…

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tumbleweeds.

What a great idea!
With Love,
Russ

I didn't have my glasses on....

shakespeare-book-shop

The Historic Parisian Bookshop Where Aspiring Writers Can Spend the Night for Free

Shakespeare and Company opened its doors back in 1951, and ever since then, it’s hosted aspiring writers for free. And it’s not always just for a night, sometimes, guests stay for months, and they don’t have to pay a penny. The Parisian literary hub may be the only bookshop in the world of its kind.

More than 30,000 guests have stayed at the bookshop since American expat George Whitman opened it over six decades ago, and many of them have even gone on to become international best sellers.

Molly Dektar, who lived at Shakespeare and Company in January and June 2013, wrote about the experience: “I aimed to read a book a day but it wasn’t entirely possible. Still, the goal is spiritually important and should be taken seriously. One minute I was a visitor just like any other,”…

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Smorgasbord Short Story – A Soldier Waits – Sally Cronin

Fellow blogger Sally Cronin wrote this story. It touched me as I believe it will touch you.

With Love,
Russ

Smorgasbord - Variety is the spice of life

short-stories-two

A Soldier Waits – Sally Cronin

David stood beside his comrades as they waited in the village square for the parade to begin. Despite their advancing years, the men stood as tall as possible, often with the aid of a stick. Two of their number were in wheelchairs, and had been guided across the cobble stones by their fellow old soldiers.

It was a typical chilly November morning with dark skies and clouds laden with imminent rain. Whilst inappropriate perhaps for this solemn occasion, the men standing huddled against the cold wind; wished for a few rays of sunshine. Their overcoats were shiny with age but their shoes were burnished to a brilliance thanks to the loving attention the night before. A reminder of a time, when the action of rubbing in polish and then shining the boots for the sergeant’s approval, was used for reflection. A time to remember…

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